Favorite Quotes on Books and Reading

"A book is a gift you can open again and again." Garrison Keillor

Literature is a textually transmitted disease, normally contracted in childhood.” Jane Yolen

"It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it." Oscar Wilde

"Books have furnished, burnished, and enabled my life." Julia Keller

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Guest Post: Gen LaGreca - JUST THE TRUTH



Good day, book people. I don't know about you, but I'm always excited to learn about new authors and books. Yes, I know that my TBR list already has thousands of books on it, but what's one or two more?! Today, I'm pleased to introduce you to Gen LaGreca, an award-winning author, and the author of the newly released Just The Truth. Ms. LaGreca will be talking to us today about fiction and the impact it has on our lives. I hope you'll enjoy meeting her, read what she has to say, and add Just The Truth to your mounting TBR list! Thank you, Ms. LaGreca for joining us today. I turn the blog over to you.


Why We Love Fiction, and How it Touches our Lives
By Gen LaGreca

Are there great novels, short stories, plays, and feature films that thrilled you, shocked you, gave you moments of nail-biting, edge-of-your-seat suspense, or steamy, passionate love scenes? Are there works of fiction that got you thinking about important issues? Did you ever wonder about the power of fiction to inform and inspire us?

News stories, textbooks, essays, articles, white papers, and nonfiction books give us a straight-forward account of factual issues, whereas works of fiction tell us a story. Fiction comes from the imagination filled with adventure, excitement, romance, intrigue, suspense, and the full gamut of emotions.

Nonfiction or Fiction? Which do you remember more?

The difference between nonfiction and fiction is like the difference between reading a flight manual and actually being in the cockpit and going for a ride.

For example, let's take a historical event: Sherman's March and the burning of Atlanta during the Civil War. How do we remember it? Through a textbook account of military strategies, generals, battles, and timelines? Or do we remember Sherman's March far more vividly from a scene in the novel and film Gone With the Wind? We're in the middle of Sherman's siege. Atlanta is wildly ablaze and in utter chaos. Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler are in a teetering wagon with a half-dead horse driving it. A mother and her just-born child are in the back of the wagon, with the mother trying to shield the infant from falling debris from the fires all around them. The characters are desperately trying to escape Atlanta, but the Confederate army is in full retreat coming at them, slowing them down—and an ammunition depot is about to explode.

You can see how fiction makes that historical event come to life in a haunting, shocking way.

Fiction depicts great struggles for freedom and independence.

The ancient myth of Prometheus relates how he stole fire from the gods and gave it to mankind. This empowered humans so that they were no longer subservient to the deities who ruled them. The gods were so infuriated by losing their power over mankind that they chained Prometheus to a rock and cruelly punished him for eternity. The quest of humans to break free from a ruling class echoes through time and is a great theme for works of fiction.

Did you know that storytelling played a role in the American Revolution? The popular 18th-century play "Cato: A Tragedy" dramatized the struggle of a political leader of Ancient Rome, Cato, who fought for republicanism against Julius Caesar's tyranny. This play was so important to George Washington that he defied a Congressional order banning the performance of plays during wartime and had the work performed to inspire his troops after their harsh winter at Valley Forge. Washington didn't give his troops a lecture or a pep talk to boost their spirits. Instead, he used the sweeping drama of a play.

In the prelude to the American Civil War, the most influential abolitionist writing was a novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was this book—a work of fiction—that became an international bestseller and galvanized the North against the evils of slavery.

Fiction has also shown us the face of evil in grim detail. The term Big Brother, which originated from George Orwell's novel 1984, has become the enduring worldwide symbol of tyranny. We still use this term today, over 70 years since the novel's original publication in 1949.

Novels have contained moving messages about freedom. Ayn Rand's epic philosophical novel, Atlas Shrugged, shows us the role of the individual's free, creative mind and productive activities as the generator of human progress. This novel has inspired millions to embrace the glory of freedom.

Stories that dramatize important ideas have always inspired me in my writing.

With no pretensions to the above works intended, I strive in my novels to create riveting plots interwoven with thought-provoking themes. My new novel, Just the Truth, is a political thriller that portrays the threats to a free press in an era of growing government power and the fearless spirit of one journalist who risks her career, her reputation—and ultimately her life— to uncover a plot to subvert free elections in America. This courageous newswoman battles a powerful bureaucracy to keep journalism, a free press—and truth—alive. It's an entertaining novel that brings to life the importance of a responsible and independent press, an accountable government, and the rule of law. It's not only for those who care about modern threats to our country's founding principles but for anyone looking for an absorbing political thriller and murder mystery.

I love to write fiction that offers a full plate of plot action served with a generous pour of intoxicating ideas. Are you ready for a sizzling read? I'm inviting you to my table.

*********


Just the Truth by Gen LeGreca
ISBN:  9780974457956 (paperback)
ASIN:  B084M65GZ3 (Kindle version)
Publisher: Winged Victory Press
Publication Date: June 1, 2020


A newswoman battles a powerful bureaucracy to keep journalism, a free press—and truth—alive.

Set in Washington, DC, in the near future, Just the Truth portrays the threats to a free press in the era of growing, unchecked government and the courageous spirit of one journalist who risks her career, her reputation—and even her life—to uncover a plot to subvert free elections in America.

Find the truth, wherever it hides was the slogan of firebrand newspaper mogul Julius Taninger (JT) in the mid-20th century. Then, politicians feared his scathing editorials. Now, 70 years later, with JT deceased and his son Clark and grandchildren Irene, Billie, and Laura Taninger running the company, have the tables turned? In modern-day America, does the press—and the broader business community—still have the freedom to criticize public officials, or do those officials have the power to silence their opponents? Laura Taninger is about to find out.

Fox... James Spenser whispers as he lay dying in Laura's arms.

She cannot let Spenser die in vain.

Having become the president of Taninger News and host of its prime time television show after the death of her intrepid grandfather, Laura becomes the sole journalist to hold President Kenneth Martin's administration accountable. The signature program of his administration, SafeVote, puts control of national elections in the hands of the federal government, rather than letting the states manage the voting in their own jurisdictions. SafeVote is scheduled to launch with the upcoming presidential election in which Martin hopes to win a second term. Laura suspects foul play when she discovers a $400 million line item in the SafeVote budget allocated to pay an elusive company for performing undisclosed services.

James Spenser, who was Laura's source within the administration, had vital information for her but was gunned down before he could reveal it. Facing the crushing retaliation of her political enemies against her family's businesses, a smear campaign to destroy her career and reputation, and the intense pressure of her family to give up her investigation, Laura persists in her quest to learn the meaning of Spenser's dying word and the secrecy surrounding SafeVote. As she gets closer to unraveling the mystery, she realizes that the facts point to shocking revelations about the man whose memory haunts her, the man who was her greatest business competitor and her most passionate lover—until he betrayed her and the ideals they shared. With Election Day looming and the country at a perilous crossroads, Laura is determined to pursue the truth wherever it leads.





Purchase Links #CommissionEarned:   IndieBound  |  Amazon  |  Amazon Kindle  



Meet the author:


Genevieve (Gen) LaGreca writes novels with innovative plots, strong romance, and themes that glorify individual freedom and independence. She has written novels of all different genres including historical, mystery, and romance fiction as well as short stories. She is one of the successful new indie authors whose novels have topped the charts in the popular ebook format. Her three previously published novels, Noble Vision, A Dream of Daring, and Fugitive From Asteron have been Amazon Kindle Best Sellers and won 11 book awards.



Connect with the author via her website, blog, Facebook, and LinkedIn.



This guest post and blog tour brought to you by PR by the Book

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