Favorite Quotes on Books and Reading

"A book is a gift you can open again and again." Garrison Keillor

Literature is a textually transmitted disease, normally contracted in childhood.” Jane Yolen

"It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it." Oscar Wilde

"Books have furnished, burnished, and enabled my life." Julia Keller

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Book Showcase: DANGEROUS GROUND by Susan Hunter

Dangerous Ground by Susan Hunter Banner


Dangerous Ground

by Susan Hunter

on Tour February 17, 2020 to March 20, 2020



Synopsis:


Dangerous Ground by Susan Hunter


A Murder Among Friends …

Everyone is anxious to connect with actor Ryan Malloy when he returns to town for his 15-year high school reunion. Everyone except crime writer Leah Nash. She doesn't have many fond memories of Himmel High's golden boy. But it turns out she's not the only one who isn't a fan. Before the weekend is over, Ryan Malloy is murdered.

The hard-headed but soft-hearted Leah is unwillingly drawn into investigating his death by the pleading of Ryan's terminally ill mother. She soon discovers that Ryan's self-absorbed journey through life trampled on the dreams of a number of people. His old girlfriend, his best friend, his own brother, a local businessman—there's no shortage of suspects—or secrets. But the solution eludes Leah, until the past and the present collide in a dangerous confrontation that threatens one life and ends another.




Book Details:


Genre: Mystery
Published by: Himmel River Press
Publication Date: November 19, 2019
Number of Pages: 364
ISBN: 1698530994 (9781698530994)
Series: Leah Nash Mysteries, Book 6
Purchase Links: Amazon | Goodreads




Read an excerpt:




Chapter 1

I parked my bike just inside the cemetery gates. It took only a few steps down the tree-lined path for the heat and humidity of a mid-summer Wisconsin day to slide away into the cool dark shade. Overhead, the soft murmur of thousands of leaves stirring in the light breeze accompanied me as I walked slowly toward my sister's grave. Both of my sisters are buried in the cemetery just a few miles outside of Himmel, Wisconsin. My father is as well. But today it was Annie I'd come to visit.

My heart beat a little faster as I neared the gravesite. I'm not afraid of the dead. It's the memories they leave behind that haunt me. Quiet Annie with her soft voice and big blue eyes, too shy to join the other laughing, shouting kindergarteners at recess—but the first to run over to comfort a little boy struggling not to cry on the first day. Imaginative Annie, commandeering our wide front porch as a sailing ship for her and her cat, Mr. Peoples, to travel around the world. Kind-hearted Annie, sharing her Halloween candy with me when I'm forced to surrender my own treats as penalty for talking back. Sweet, brave, compassionate, eight-year-old Annie, who ran into a burning house to save Mr. Peoples twenty-two years ago, and never came back.

Over all the years since, people—my mother, my aunt, my therapist (yes, I went that route once), my best friend—have reassured me that her death wasn't my fault, that I was just a child. But, I was older. I should have been watching over her. I should have seen her slipping back to the house after we'd all escaped. In my deep heart's core, I can't ever forget that.

Now and then, and always on her birthday, I go to the cemetery to see her. I know that she isn't really there. But her grave is an anchoring spot for me. I catch her up on the good, the bad, and the ugly happenings in my life. She knows what hurts me, and she knows what frightens me—secrets I don't share with anyone else. I tell her what our mother is up to, and how others she knew in life are doing. I say all the things to her that I would if she were still here. I try to make up for the fact that I'm alive, and she isn't. But, of course, I never can.

When I'm talking to her at the cemetery, it feels as though she can really hear me. And I know that she answers. Not right there, at the grave, but later, in unexpected ways. Sometimes, I hear Annie speak to me through a chance remark a stranger makes, or a phrase that leaps out at me from a book, or a sudden flash of insight on a problem I'm wrestling with. I don't share that belief with very many people. If I did, I might be forced to resign my membership in the Doubting Thomas Society, to which all good journalists should belong. But I can't accept that those occurrences are just coincidental. I really can't.

So, on the anniversary of her birth, once again I sat down on the bench in front of her grave and told her how sorry I was that she had died. That I hadn't saved her. That I still missed her. And then I told her what was really going on in the seemingly successful life of Leah Nash, former small-town reporter, current true crime author, and soon-to-be business failure.

***

When I say I talk to Annie, I mean that literally. I have a one-sided, out-loud conversation with her, though only when I'm sure I'm alone. Some people already think I'm crazy. No need to give them additional proof. On this particular day, I had a serious problem weighing on my mind.

Not long before, I had made what seemed, at the time, like a brilliant decision. The Himmel Times Weekly, the paper where I'd started out in journalism, and where I'd found a home again after a self-inflicted career injury, was closing. I decided to buy it. I asked a wealthy, community-minded, local attorney, Miller Caldwell, to invest with me. And then I asked a lot of other people—reporters, an editor, stringers, office and sales staff—to work very hard, for very little money, in the hope that together we could keep the Himmel Times alive.

It was exhilarating at first. But it had become an increasing source of anxiety for me. Just as we were getting off the ground, Grantland County Online, a digital-only news site (and I use the term "news" loosely), had gotten a major infusion of capital and a new publisher. Now GO News, as it's more commonly known, was kicking our butt.

"The scariest thing, Annie," I said, "is that we're barely keeping our heads above water, while GO News keeps getting bigger. They don't have the expenses we do—no print edition, no delivery costs, and they don't spend a lot of staff time fact-checking. Plus, they started Tea to GO. Did you know that the cool kids say, 'spill the tea,' when they mean 'what's the gossip?'

"Tea to GO is full of 'What married school official was seen in Milwaukee with a very attractive staff member last Thursday night? Did we say late, last Thursday night?' That kind of garbage. It's almost all blind items—the better to avoid lawsuits, my dear. But people are eating it up. Every time you go into the Elite CafĂ©, someone is trying to figure out who the latest gossip is about."

I paused for a bit of a wallow in self-pity. It wasn't as if I hadn't tried to shake things up at the Times, to get us moving ahead, but so far nothing I'd done had made much difference.

"We have a good team. Miguel is much happier since he gave up the managing editor job. He really didn't like bossing people. And Maggie McConnell is doing great in that spot. She's got the instincts, the skills, and forty-five years in the news business behind her. If she could only spin straw out of gold, she'd be perfect. But since she can't, we're making do with a budget so lean it might as well be made out of turkey burger.

"I gave Allie Ross—you remember, I told you about her. She's the high school kid we've been using as a stringer. Anyway, I gave her a part-time job for the summer in the office. She's doing the routine stuff, obits and inside pages copy—weddings, anniversaries, club news. She's got promise, but she's only fifteen. Troy, the other reporter besides Miguel, is a little bit of a suck-up—and his news judgment isn't quite there yet. Still, he's a hard worker. The stringers are a pretty mixed bag.
"Now, here's a twist I bet you didn't see coming. I hired Mom to take April Nelson's place as office manager. I know, I know, it's a dicey move. But she's smart, and efficient, and she gets the job done. Plus, she comes cheap. It's been a little challenging, I admit. Remember when I used to get mad at her and say, 'You're not the boss of me!' and she'd send me to my room?

"Well, now I'm the boss of her, only I don't get to send her to her room. Yes, OK, I'm not supposed to be doing the day-to-day. That's Maggie's job. I understand that. But I can't just hide away in my office and write my next book if the paper is falling apart two floors below me, can I?

"Everybody took a leap of faith when we reopened the Times, and everyone is putting everything they have into it. I can't let them down. I have to find a way to keep us afloat. I just didn't know it would be so hard, Annie."

I paused for a breath before I wrapped things up.

"And then there's Gabe. I don't know. I like him as well—no, probably better than—anyone I've gone out with in a long time. He makes me laugh, and he's really smart. And he likes strong women who speak their minds. In my experience, a lot of men don't. So what's the problem, right? Well, it's not exactly a problem. It's more that I'm afraid a problem might be coming. Lately, it feels like he's pushing me a little, like for a commitment or something. Can't we just enjoy each other? Can't we just be without getting all serious, and defining things, and making plans? I don't want to change things. That's when things go bad, when you try to change them."

I slumped back against the bench with a sigh. Usually, when I lay everything out to Annie, it makes the issues seem a little more manageable. This time it all still felt overwhelming.

Then, a voice spoke.

***

Fortunately for my mental health, it wasn't Annie's. I turned and looked behind me.

"Coop! How long have you been standing there?" I asked, trying to remember exactly what I'd said out loud. It's not that Coop and I have major secrets. He's my best friend, after all. Still, I don't tell him everything I tell Annie.

"Long enough," he said with a grin that didn't offer me much comfort. I tried to move the conversation away from my chat with Annie, particularly the Gabe part.

"What are you doing here?"

"Your mom said you were here. I called your cell, but it didn't go through."

"Yeah. It's a dead zone—pun totally intended—in the cemetery, except for the hill. What did you want?"

"Nothing. I brought something for Annie."

I looked down at his right hand and saw that he carried a small pot of pink flowers. Pink was Annie's favorite color. Tears sprang to my eyes. I quickly blinked them away.

"That's so nice. Why?"

He shrugged. "I know what today is."

I'm all about keeping my tough outer shell polished, but I was so touched, I couldn't keep up the facade. "You're a pretty great friend, you know that?"

He smiled, but he looked embarrassed, and tried to cover it by moving to put the flowers next to Annie's headstone.

"Did you really come just to put flowers on Annie's grave?"

"No, not just for Annie. I took some to Rebecca, too." He was kneeling, positioning the flowers, with his back to me. I couldn't see his expression.

"Oh."

Rebecca had been Coop's wife and my nemesis until she was killed last year. I wasn't happy that Coop had lost someone he loved, but I couldn't pretend I was sorry she was gone. She'd done everything she could to break up our twenty-year friendship and came close to succeeding. I couldn't think of anything nice to say about her. So, I employed the Thumper rule, and didn't say anything.

Coop apparently didn't want to get into the subject of Rebecca either, because as he stood and turned to me, he said, "I'll walk out with you. I've got my truck. We can throw your bike in the back and you can ride home with me."

"Yes, please. I didn't realize it was so hot. I just about sweated to death pedaling out here."

"Yeah, I can see that," he said, taking in my damp, bedraggled hair, slipping from its hair clip, and the beads of moisture coalescing into a river of sweat running down the side of my forehead. "You kind of look like you just took a shower." He sniffed the air, "Except you don't have that shower-fresh scent."

"Shut up," I said. "I'm a head-sweater from way back. Deal with it." I smiled though, because there's something very nice and very easy being with a person who really doesn't care how you look—or in the present situation—smell.

We walked together in companionable silence, until I'd decided he hadn't heard any of my one-sided conversation with Annie. That dream died in the next minute.

"So, what's going on with you and Gabe? He's a nice guy, Leah. You're not getting ready to toss him overboard, too, are you?"

"No. Why would you say that? And what do you mean by 'too'?"

"You really want to go there?" He cocked an eyebrow. It's a not very funny running joke between Coop and my mother that I always find a reason to cut my romances short.

"No, I don't. I thought you didn't believe in illegal surveillance, and what do you call lurking around cemeteries where people are having a private conversation? It's nothing. Really."

He looked at me for a second, but all he said was, "OK."

Our conversation was cut off as a tall woman in her fifties, her hair pulled back and hanging in a long, gray braid down her back, appeared and abruptly crossed the path in front of us.

"Hello, Marcy," I said.

She looked up as though surprised we were there.

"Leah. Coop." She nodded but didn't stop to talk. We knew where she was going. To the top of the hill on which sat a small granite building that resembled an ancient Greek temple. The family mausoleum held Marcy's grandparents, her own mother, and Marcy's baby daughter, Robin. One day, it would hold Marcy, too.

We watched in silence as she reached the building, pulled a key out of her pocket, unlocked the door, and slipped inside, like a ghost gliding through a wall. It had been sixteen years since Marcy White's baby had died, and she still came every week. People said she brought a different book each time and read it to Robin. They said it like it was something weird, or even crazy. Not me, though. I understood why she did it.

"You know what, Coop?" I asked, as we continued on down the path.

"What?"

"I'm calling bullshit on death."

***


Excerpt from Dangerous Ground by Susan Hunter.  Copyright © 2019 by Susan Hunter. Reproduced with permission from Susan Hunter. All rights reserved.



Author Bio:


Susan Hunter
Susan Hunter is a charter member of Introverts International (which meets the 12th of Never at an undisclosed location). She has worked as a reporter and managing editor, during which time she received a first place UPI award for investigative reporting and a Michigan Press Association first place award for enterprise/feature reporting.

Susan has also taught composition at the college level, written advertising copy, newsletters, press releases, speeches, web copy, academic papers, and memos. Lots and lots of memos. She lives in rural Michigan with her husband Gary, who is a man of action, not words.

During certain times of the day, she can be found wandering the mean streets of small-town Himmel, Wisconsin, looking for clues, stopping for a meal at the Elite Cafe, dropping off a story lead at the Himmel Times Weekly, or meeting friends for a drink at McClain's Bar and Grill.

Catch Up With Susan Hunter On:


LeahNashMysteries.com, Goodreads, BookBub, Instagram, Twitter, & Facebook!


Tour Participants:



Visit these other great hosts on this tour for more great reviews, interviews, guest posts, and giveaways!






Enter To Win!!:



This is a Rafflecopter giveaway hosted by Partners in Crime Virtual Book Tours for Susan Hunter. There will be 1 winner of one (1) Amazon.com Gift Card. The giveaway begins on February 17, 2020, and runs through March 21, 2020. Void where prohibited.

a Rafflecopter giveaway




Friday, February 28, 2020

Guest Post: Tina Kashian - ON THE LAMB



Hello, my bookish peeps. I hope everyone is staying warm and dry with this crazy weather. Most of my friends know that I am not a cook, but the one thing I do is collect recipes. Strange habit, I know but I'm absolutely fascinated by recipes especially those from different countries. Needless to say, I jumped for joy, figuratively speaking, when offered the opportunity to host another visit by Tina Kashian, author of the Kebab Kitchen Mediterranean Mystery series, including the latest in this series, On The Lamb. I don't want to give you too much information, but Ms. Kashian will sharing some behind-the-scenes information on this series with us AND a recipe. Who knows, I just might give this recipe a try? Please join me and welcome Tina Kashian. Thank you, Ms. Kashian for visiting with us today.







Thank you for inviting me to chat with your readers about my new release, On the Lamb. It's the fourth book in my Kebab Kitchen Mediterranean mystery series.

I grew up in a family-owned restaurant in New Jersey, and my Kebab Kitchen Mystery Series is set in a Mediterranean restaurant at the Jersey shore. In On the Lamb, Lucy Berberian is a recovering lawyer who returns to Ocean Crest, NJ and her family's restaurant, Kebab Kitchen. Managing a restaurant is hard work and when Lucy is invited to a beach bonfire with friends, she's excited for a night out. But things take a turn for the worse when a disliked, local landlord shows up on the beach and gets in a screaming match with one of Lucy's friends, Melanie Haven, owner of Haven Candies on the boardwalk. And when that same landlord is found dead on the beach after apparently choking on a piece of Melanie's salt water taffy, Melanie is in a sticky mess of trouble. It's up to Lucy to investigate and help her candy maker friend before salt water taffy disappears from the boardwalk forever.

Many scenes in the series take place on the Jersey Shore boardwalk. I vacationed at the Jersey Shore as a kid and we continue to visit with my two girls every summer. We can't imagine a beach vacation without going to one of the eateries, riding the boardwalk Ferris wheel, and enjoying the famous salt water taffy and fudge at the candy shops.

As for beach bonfires, I've attended quite a few myself. The sound of the surf, the sand between my toes, the ocean breeze, and the blazing bonfire all make for a unique experience. But thankfully, I've never experienced a murder at any of them!

I'm sharing a Mediterranean recipe for couscous salad from my own family's restaurant below (the couscous is featured in On the Lamb as well!)



Lucy's Mediterranean Couscous Salad
¾ cup uncooked couscous
1 cup chicken broth
1½  cup cubed tomatoes
1½  cup peeled cucumber
½ cup halved pitted kalamata olives
¼ cup chopped sweet onions
2½ tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste


In saucepan, heat chicken broth to boiling. Stir in couscous. Remove from heat. Cover and let stand five minutes. Fluff with a fork.

In large bowl, place tomatoes, cucumber, olives, and onions. Stir in couscous.

Add lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper. Mix well. Cover and refrigerate for an hour. Enjoy!



Read the blurb below to find out what happens when Lucy does find a dead body at a Jersey shore bonfire.




On the Lamb (A Kebab Kitchen Mystery)

by Tina Kashian


About On The Lamb


On the Lamb (A Kebab Kitchen Mystery)
Cozy Mystery
4th in Series
Publisher: Kensington (February 25, 2020)
Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
ISBN-10:      1496726057
ISBN-13:      9781496726056
eBook ISBN: 9781496726063  
Kindle ASIN:  B07R8WVPMX




Lucy Berberian is busy preparing her family's Mediterranean restaurant for Easter on the Jersey Shore—but a batch of sweets is to die for...

Bikers are thundering into the seaside town of Ocean Crest for the annual Bikers on the Beach gathering that raises funds for injured veterans. It's a big boost for the Kebab Kitchen, as well as for local businesses like Melanie Haven's candy shop. But Melanie is about to find herself in a sticky situation.

When Melanie and Lucy attend a beach bonfire, a local landlord is found dead after apparently choking on a piece of salt water taffy. Melanie, who was known to have a contentious relationship with the victim, is quickly skewered as the prime suspect. But Lucy is determined to prove her friend's innocence before the real killer coasts free . . .

Recipes included!


Purchase Links #CommissionEarned:     IndieBound  |  Amazon  |  Amazon Kindle  |  Barnes & Noble  |  B&N NOOK Book  |  BookDepository  |  Books-A-Million  |  eBooks  |  Google Books  |  iBooks  |  !ndigo  |  Kobo eBook  




About Tina Kashian


Tina Kashian is a bestselling author, an attorney, and a mechanical engineer whose love of reading for pleasure helped her get through years of academia. Tina spent her childhood summers at the Jersey shore building sandcastles, boogie boarding, and riding the boardwalk Ferris wheel. She also grew up in the restaurant business, as her Armenian parents owned a restaurant for thirty years. Tina's books have been Barnes & Noble top picks, and the first book in her Kebab Kitchen Mediterranean mystery series, Hummus and Homicide, spent six weeks on the B&N bestseller list. Please visit her website at www.tinakashian.com to join her newsletter, receive delicious recipes, enter contests, and more!


Author Links

 

  • Website: tinakashian.com

  •  

  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TinaKashianAuthor/

  •  

  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/TinaKashian1

  •  

  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tinakashian/

  •  

  • Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16902011.Tina_Kashian




  • Giveaway
    a Rafflecopter giveaway






    TOUR PARTICIPANTS

    February 25 – Cozy Up With Kathy – REVIEW

    February 25 – Elizabeth McKenna - Author – SPOTLIGHT

    February 25 – Readeropolis – SPOTLIGHT

    February 26 – Baroness' Book Trove – REVIEW

    February 26 – Brooke Blogs – GUEST POST

    February 26 – I'm All About Books – SPOTLIGHT

    February 27 – This Is My Truth Now – AUTHOR INTERVIEW


    February 28 – The Book Diva's Reads – GUEST POST

    February 28 – The Avid Reader – REVIEW

    February 29 - Laura`s Interests – REVIEW

    February 29 - Christy's Cozy Corners – CHARACTER GUEST POST

    March 1 – Gimme The Scoop Reviews – REVIEW

    March 1 – Lisa Ks Book Reviews – REVIEW, INTERVIEW

    March 2 – Literary Gold – CHARACTER GUEST POST

    March 2 – Devilishly Delicious Book Reviews – REVIEW

    March 3 – Ascroft, eh? – CHARACTER INTERVIEW

    March 3 – Reading Is My SuperPower – REVIEW

    March 4 – Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book - REVIEW, GUEST POST

    March 4 – Hearts & Scribbles – SPOTLIGHT

    March 5 – Celticlady's Reviews – SPOTLIGHT

    March 5 – Dee-Scoveries – SPOTLIGHT

    March 6 – StoreyBook Reviews - REVIEW

    March 6 – MJB Reviewers – REVIEW

    March 7 – Melina's Book Blog – REVIEW

    March 7 – A Wytch's Book Review Blog – REVIEW, CHARACTER INTERVIEW




    Have you signed up to be a Tour Host?



    Wednesday, February 26, 2020

    Guest Post: Kate Parker - MURDER AT THE MARLOWE CLUB



    Good Day, book people. I hope everyone is having a good week so far. I'm incredibly happy to welcome today's guest. Our guest today is not only taking time to step off the pages to visit with us but she's also stepping a bit out-of-time. Fresh off the pages of Murder at the Marlowe Club by Kate Parker, I give you Miss Emily Gates. Thank you, Miss Gates, for taking the time to visit us today and provide us with some background information. I hope we won't keep you too long from your job at Duquesne's Millinery or your fine detecting work.




    Hello, I'm Emily Gates. Kate Parker is making a study of murder cases where I've been instrumental in bringing killers to justice. So far she's written two books about me, The Killing at Kaldaire House and Murder at the Marlowe Club. To give her credit, I think Kate has done a good job of reporting on my adventures.

    I should introduce myself. I'm a milliner, designing and making hats at Duquesne's Millinery. The firm was started by my mother and her cousin, Noah. My childhood memories revolve around countless hours of practice making ribbon flowers and dyeing feathers, cutting felt, and blocking forms. It's a good thing that I spent so much time learning the business, since a fever that crossed London when I was eighteen killed my mother and struck my little brother deaf at the age of eight.

    My father? You want to know about him? Why? We don't get along. He was no help when my mother was alive nor when she died, and he's been no help since. My mother warned me that he was useless, that he was a crook, that his entire family were criminals, and I should have nothing to do with any of them.

    I agreed with her about my father, but I've always had a soft spot for my grandfather. I'm his only granddaughter amid more than a dozen grandsons, and he's always treated me as his favorite. Despite the division of boys' activities and girls' activities during the reign of the old queen that have continued into the new century, Grandpa always included me in his lessons. I learned to pick locks, find hidden compartments, pickpockets, do sleight of hand, and even perform some elementary safecracking along with my cousins.

    Once my mother died, I was so busy keeping the business running and raising my brother that I didn't have time to see my father's family. My father didn't come to see my mother when she was dying, so I have had no desire to see him since.

    Five or six years passed before I could raise my head to look around. The business was thriving, as much as any business could that depended on aristocrats. Unlike normal people, many aristocrats pay their bills rarely, if at all. It has to do with the sale of crops from their estates, which is fine for them, but not so much for tradespeople who like the prestige of aristocratic clients but not their slowness in paying bills.

    Matthew, my little brother who is deaf, had outgrown the local schools, and I wanted to send him to a prestigious boarding school for deaf students. That would require every penny I could spare, which meant I would have to find a way to urge my aristocratic clients to pay me first. I decided I would have to use some of the skills I learned from my father's family to get them to pay up. The second time I tried an unconventional bill collection method, I met Lady Kaldaire and became involved in my first murder investigation.

    Somehow, we survived that adventure, but when a friend of Lady Kaldaire started losing family members, she decided I was the best choice to find their killer. And so we began the adventure called Murder at the Marlowe Club.


    Kate Parker enjoys her travels into the heart of Edwardian London with Emily Gates. Their current story is Murder at the Marlowe Club.



    Murder at the Marlowe Club (The Milliner Mysteries)

    by Kate Parker

    About Murder at the Marlowe Club





    Historical Cozy Mystery
    2nd in Series
    Publisher: JDP Press (February 24, 2020)
    Print Length: 209 pages
    Digital ASIN: B083M97VWP


    Purchase Links    - Amazon  - B&N - Apple -Kobo


    A corpse in a corset. A dangerous gambling den. A perilous path between safety and peril.

    London, 1905. Leading milliner Emily Gates' illegal shortcut through a private park in the rain brought her straight to a scantily clothed corpse. Then her route took her straight into the hands of the indefatigable Lady Kaldaire, who recognized the body as a relative of her longtime friend, the Duchess of Wallingford. Lady Kaldaire blackmailed Emily before to find Lord Kaldaire's killer. Why not this murderer, too?

    Emily has plenty of reasons why not, but finding links between her father's nefarious family of crooks and conmen and the debauchery of the secretive Marlowe Club involves her in the investigation led by the handsome Inspector Russell of Scotland Yard. Emily discovers more than she expects about the licentious world of the corpse through her aristocratic customers, including Georgia, heroine of the Victorian Bookshop Mysteries, now the Duchess of Blackford.

    Are the scandal rags correct, or has the victim been maligned by a mastermind who'll stop at nothing to gain everything?

    This is a historical cozy mystery with no graphic violence, sex, or foul language. Just exciting action, mysterious events, and surprising endings.



    About Kate Parker


    Kate Parker grew up reading her mother's collection of mystery books and her father's library of history and biography books. Now she can't write a story that isn't set in the past with a few decent corpses littered about.

    Author Links

    Website - www.KateParkerbooks.com, Facebook - www.facebook.com/Author.Kate.Parker, BookBub - www.bookbub.com/authors/kate-parker



    Giveaway

    a Rafflecopter giveaway




    TOUR PARTICIPANTS

    February 24 – My Journey Back – REVIEW, CHARACTER INTERVIEW

    February 24 – Here's How It Happened – SPOTLIGHT

    February 25 – Jane Reads – GUEST POST

    February 25 – Baroness' Book Trove – SPOTLIGHT

    February 26 – The Book Diva's Reads - CHARACTER GUEST POST

    February 26 – Readeropolis – SPOTLIGHT

    February 27 – Ascroft, eh? – CHARACTER INTERVIEW

    February 28 – MJB Reviewers – AUTHOR INTERVIEW

    February 29 - Elizabeth McKenna - Author – SPOTLIGHT

    March 1 – The Editing Pen – GUEST POST

    March 2 – I'm All About Books – SPOTLIGHT

    March 3 – Mysteries with Character – AUTHOR INTERVIEW

    March 3 – Literary Gold – SPOTLIGHT

    March 4 – StoreyBook Reviews - CHARACTER GUEST POST

    March 5 – Celticlady's Reviews – SPOTLIGHT

    March 5 – Christy's Cozy Corners – REVIEW

    March 6 – Cozy Up WIth Kathy – REVIEW

    March 6 – eBook Addicts – SPOTLIGHT

    March 7 – Brooke Blogs – SPOTLIGHT

    March 7 – Lisa Ks Book Reviews – REVIEW, AUTHOR INTERVIEW

    March 8 – I Read What You Write – CHARACTER INTERVIEW

    March 8 – Gimme The Scoop Reviews – REVIEW



    Have you signed up to be a Tour Host?





    Book Spotlight: I KNOW WHEN YOU'RE GOING TO DIE by Michael J. Bowler








    I Know When You're Going to Die

    by Michael J. Bowler 

    Genre: YA Mystery, Thriller





    Leonardo Cantrell is a painfully shy sixteen-year-old who cannot look people in the eye. One night while he's volunteering at a homeless shelter, an old man forces eye contact and gives Leo the power to see Death. 

    His best, and only, friend—J.C. Rivera—thinks this new power is cool until Leo accidentally looks into J.C.'s eyes and "sees" his murder, a murder that will occur in less than two weeks. Stunned and shaken, the two boys sift through clues in Leo's "vision" in a desperate effort to find the killer and stop him before he can strike. 

    Aided by feisty new-girl-at-school, Laura, the boys uncover evidence suggesting the identity of the murderer. However, their plan to trap the would-be killer goes horribly awry and reveals a truth that could kill them all.



    **only 99 cents until March 10th !!** 




    Purchase Links:  Amazon * Apple * B&N * Kobo







    Michael J. Bowler is an award-winning author who grew up in Northern California. He majored in English/Theatre at Santa Clara University, earned a Master's in Film Production from Loyola Marymount University, a Teaching Credential in English from LMU, and a Master's in Special Education from Cal State University Dominguez Hills. Michael taught high school in Hawthorne, California for many years, both in general education and students with disabilities. When Michael is not writing you can find him volunteering as a youth mentor with the Big Brothers Big Sisters program, volunteering within the juvenile justice system in Los Angeles, or caring for his newly adopted son. He is a passionate advocate for the fair treatment of children and teens in California, and hopes his books can show young people they are not alone in their struggles.



    Website * Blog * Facebook * Twitter * Instagram * Pinterest * Bookbub * Amazon * Goodreads 







    $25 Amazon gift card

    Follow the tour HERE for special content and a giveaway!


    a Rafflecopter giveaway